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#67543 - 04/19/10 08:41 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: johnmc04]
freekick Offline
addict

Registered: 04/02/08
Posts: 408
Thanks John ... I'll check them out. It has to be better than seeing all of Andy's repetitive screeds.

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#67553 - 04/20/10 07:36 AM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: freekick]
Duane Pipe Offline
journeyman

Registered: 01/24/06
Posts: 71
Loc: Lone Jack, Mo

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#67581 - 04/20/10 08:21 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: Duane Pipe]
AndyBarney Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 06/14/06
Posts: 1684
Legend’s Psyche - Developing a Great Soccer Mind

In life some of the hardest things to teach and learn are honesty, hard work, creativity, leadership and the entrepreneurial spirit. In soccer amongst the hardest things to develop are class, work ethic, skill, self-belief and the “Big Play” mentality.

Great soccer coaches need to understand the development of the last three characteristics and the role of the mind in that process. Whether you are big or small you, and all other normal adults, have about 50 ounces of incredible body tissue. Guarded by the bones of the skull is the most delicate, intricate and complicated computer known to man. It’s your brain and it’s 100% yours. If nurtured effectively it will bring you joy, achievement and fulfillment in abundance. Your mind is the most incredible information processor and action generator on the planet. It is fundamentally the same as the minds of Albert Einstein, Winston Churchill, Mahatma Gandhi and Bill Gates, all of who have changed the world for the better in so many ways. The wealth of spirit that can be earned from the development and exploration of your own mind is unlimited. It can absorb any aspect of the world’s historical data and expand upon that theme to open up horizons and vistas yet unknown.

This should give you a better understanding of the potential of the human brain. However, most people use a mere fraction of their mind’s capacity. We too often dwell on the unimportant and insignificant instead of using our minds to expand and grow. The commercial world uses computer programmers to set up their computer networks and ready them for action. However, the output from the computer is entirely dependent upon the input from the programmer. In the academic world the university uses lecturers to get the student ready for the advanced challenges of everyday life. In the world of sports the organization uses the coach to ready the players for the challenges of fierce competition. In both environments the student or player will usually reflect the quality of the input from the lecturer or coach.

The mind has an infinite capacity. Therefore the “programmer” has a vital role and fundamental responsibility to maximize the creative capacities of the pupil. This applies to all learning environments and it is essential that parents and older children examine and understand the vital importance of what is being taught in all learning arenas including soccer. Your mind is “the computer” and you are being “programmed” by a coach. If you are programmed with positive information the results will be positive and worthwhile. If you are fed negative information, the results will be negative and you will be destined to fail. Wise men and philosophers through the ages have disagreed about many things but they are unanimously in agreement on one point, we become what we think about!

That is why you must focus primarily on the creative offensive part of the game. If you focus on the development of tremendous individual skill you “input” the finest data into your computer (mind). If you are focused on solving the more difficult problems of how to beat a player and score, you will easily develop the simpler team skills of creating space and passing to a teammate. If you are focused on developing the mental attributes necessary to develop fantastic individual skill and make big plays, you will develop a tremendous self-concept and phenomenal soccer confidence that will carry over into other arenas in life. More than anything you must develop the creative soccer mind. No matter what physiological limitations you may have, you can still develop the mind of a Pele. Creative thinking is not the sole domain of the fast player. The reverse is actually more often the case because slower players can’t rely on their athleticism to win the battle.

In school you will benefit to the maximum degree from striving for individual brilliance. Soccer is no different. You will benefit optimally from striving for mental and neuromuscular superiority. The only way to achieve this is to develop:
• The most incredible individual skills.
• The tactical speed to utilize those skills successfully under the greatest physical pressure.
• The self-concept and leadership mentality necessary to embrace and relish the challenge of learning to do this at the very highest level of competition.
You will notice that the last two of those characteristics are completely cerebral but both are totally dependent on the first, which is primarily repetitive and physical in nature.

That is why the first step in the Legends program is teaching the neuromuscular skill needed to perform the world’s most effective fakes and moves, followed by the ability to shoot with accuracy and power.

The second component of the “Training Soccer Legends” approach, i.e. micro tactical speed, is developed maximally by constantly exposing the players to 1 v 1 situations in small congested areas in front of goal (“the clutch”). This is accompanied by expecting the players to perform their fakes and take-on opponents in all areas of the field, in all league and tournament matches.

The third stage i.e. macro tactical speed, is developed maximally by constantly exposing the players to 2 v 2 practice situations in small congested areas in front of goal (“the clutch”), and expecting them to use quick passing combinations, combination fakes and dribbling skills in all areas of the field, in all league and tournament matches.

A high self-concept and great leadership skills are mind based qualities that occur as a result of all three stages because players who have great skill and the ability to make big plays in the most congested of conditions cannot help but grow into team leaders. This becomes especially evident when our players play in programs unrelated to the Legends i.e. guest playing for other teams, State Select, High School or College. In these situations our players, (because they are trained to perform the most difficult creative skills at speed), stand out, head and shoulders above the rest and assume leadership roles that others are incapable of performing.

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#67600 - 04/21/10 10:36 AM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: AndyBarney]
mude Offline
enthusiast

Registered: 10/29/09
Posts: 387
Originally Posted By: AndyBarney
Legend’s Psyche - Developing a Great Soccer Mind

No matter what physiological limitations you may have, you can still develop the mind of a Pele. Creative thinking is not the sole domain of the fast player. The reverse is actually more often the case because slower players can’t rely on their athleticism to win the battle.




I actually read this one because the title caught my eye as I am interested athletic "smarts." I think it is something that is often underestimated in importance.

That being said, I suspect that it is more like a traditional athletic ability like speed than some think. Understanding and instantly analyzing the angles. Is a guy open? Constantly being in the right place. Knowing whether to take a person on or play a give-and-go. I have not analyzed Pele or even know much about his "smarts," but if the suggestion is that he was a very "smart" player, then it is not clear to me that just anyone can think like him. Clearly guys like Gretzky or Bird in their respective sports displayed sports smarts that are not so easily duplicated.

It is easy to assume that one can learn the one-on-one skills at an early age and pick up the "smarts" later. But, I regularly see some of the best athletes/one-on-one specialists struggle with threading the needle and basic decision making. It really takes both to be great and most people will not be great obviously. In both traditional athletic ability and "smarts," it appears to me to be a combination of nature and nurture.

Probably similar to school, "smarts" tend to show up more as you get older. It is less obvious when doing fairly basic stuff or competing against weak oponents.

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#67606 - 04/21/10 12:42 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: mude]
KC Soccer Dad Offline
enthusiast

Registered: 04/05/05
Posts: 289
Isn't this the classic nature versus nurture argument? Reminds me of the movie Amadeus. No matter how hard he worked, Salieri was never going to develop what Mozart had. Mozart had it, Salieri did not (though Salieri was very accomplished as measured by a scale excluding Mozart).

Since Andy's programs have never produced a Pele--again a truly special player--I wonder what makes him think that he can have my kid develop Pele's mind even if they don't have Pele's athletic ability. Hope springs eternal I suppose.
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#67613 - 04/21/10 01:59 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: KC Soccer Dad]
Relegators Offline
journeyman

Registered: 01/27/09
Posts: 61
"I don't believe there is such a thing as a 'born' soccer player. Perhaps you are born with certain skills and talents, but quite frankly it seems impossible to me that one is actually born to be an ace soccer player. Success is no accident. It is hard work, perseverance, learning, studying, sacrifice and most of all, love of what you are doing or learning to do. It is because of this that I decided to help youngsters with my experience. That's why this book exists."

- Edson Arantes do Nascimento AKA "Pele"; From the book, "Play Soccer with Pelé", the man in his own words.

I would take the diligent hard-working average athlete over the natural talent anytime.

Pele's father was a minor league soccer player and Pele was lucky enough to be trained as a junior player by Waldemar de Brito a former captain of the Brazil National Team. I suspect the training he received, training hours he endured, and a tremendous desire to excel had more to do with his success than any "natural gifts" he may have inherited.

If Pele doesn't himself believe his success was due to natural talent, then why would anyone else believe that?

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#67616 - 04/21/10 02:12 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: Relegators]
mude Offline
enthusiast

Registered: 10/29/09
Posts: 387
Originally Posted By: Relegators
"I don't believe there is such a thing as a 'born' soccer player. Perhaps you are born with certain skills and talents, but quite frankly it seems impossible to me that one is actually born to be an ace soccer player. Success is no accident. It is hard work, perseverance, learning, studying, sacrifice and most of all, love of what you are doing or learning to do. It is because of this that I decided to help youngsters with my experience. That's why this book exists."

- Edson Arantes do Nascimento AKA "Pele"; From the book, "Play Soccer with Pelé", the man in his own words.

I would take the diligent hard-working average athlete over the natural talent anytime.

Pele's father was a minor league soccer player and Pele was lucky enough to be trained as a junior player by Waldemar de Brito a former captain of the Brazil National Team. I suspect the training he received, training hours he endured, and a tremendous desire to excel had more to do with his success than any "natural gifts" he may have inherited.

If Pele doesn't himself believe his success was due to natural talent, then why would anyone else believe that?





I hope my point did not come across as I thought it was all about natural "smarts" or talent. I am simply suggesting that it is a combination of nature and nurture for both the traditional athletic traits and "smarts" (which I actually consider to be part of athletic ability).

As a side note, I do think Pele had some amazing natural athletic abilities that were nurtured. You (nor he) has to agree, but I suspect if you had everyone do the same training as Pele did, that you would find a whole range of different results.






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#67621 - 04/21/10 05:35 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: Relegators]
KC Soccer Dad Offline
enthusiast

Registered: 04/05/05
Posts: 289
Originally Posted By: Relegators
I would take the diligent hard-working average athlete over the natural talent anytime.


How far would the diligent hard-working average athlete get with the same training that Pele got?

Was Pele simply a diligent hard-working average athlete? Or was he a special athlete, who was specially motivated and specially trained?

Last year, the Colorado Rockies replaced their manager Clint Hurdle with Jim Tracy and the team became far more successful (10 games below .500 under Hurdle; 22 games over under Tracy). So coaching does matter. But would Tracy have been as successful taking the roster from the Rockies' triple-A affiliate (special athletes in their own right) and competing in the National League West?

My guess is no but I'm sure there's someone who would beg to differ.
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#67633 - 04/22/10 09:19 AM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: KC Soccer Dad]
NeedTuition Offline
addict

Registered: 01/29/07
Posts: 405
KC,

Clint Hurdle took the Rockies to the World Series in 2007, did his coaching skills diminish so much in 18 months that he should be fired? Was there something else at play?

Obviously talent and work ethic are necessary to improve one's athletic output, but that doesn't guarantee success. (Hurdle was on the cover of Sporting News when he broke into the majors with the Royals.)

There's a whole level of team dynamics that operate independent of individual talent that's also very important for success. Sometimes its there, sometimes not. When it goes away, usually the manager does too.

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#67636 - 04/22/10 01:52 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: NeedTuition]
KC Soccer Dad Offline
enthusiast

Registered: 04/05/05
Posts: 289
Originally Posted By: NeedTuition
Obviously talent and work ethic are necessary to improve one's athletic output, but that doesn't guarantee success.


I wholeheartedly agree. If there were a tried and true formula that definitely worked, most people would be attempting to repeat it. There are variables that work both for and against superb success that transcend natural talent and great training/coaching, which is why it really bothers me whenever Andy compares his program and the benefits that he ascribes to it to the success of true soccer superstars and things in their past that made them who they are or were in the soccer world. When Andy starts producing Peles, Ronaldinhos or Christiano Ronaldos, I'll re-think my position. Until he does, I wonder what is it that keeps him from producing Peles, Ronaldinhos or Ronaldos? Is the the program or the players being run through the program or both?
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