Who's Online
0 registered (), 14 Guests and 6 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Top Posters
coachkev 5098
johnmc04 2873
paul12 2810
Willy 2451
Keep It Fun 2404
Page 273 of 298 < 1 2 ... 271 272 273 274 275 ... 297 298 >
Topic Options
#74558 - 01/13/11 12:02 AM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: AndyBarney]
Kaka Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 02/21/07
Posts: 2316
You kind of remind me of Paula Abdul sometimes. And we all know what happened to her. I don't want to see you have to rebrand over to Happy Feet Dance clinics because you ticked off all the soccer parents.

Top
#74570 - 01/13/11 02:12 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: Kaka]
AndyBarney Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 06/14/06
Posts: 1713
Quote:
You kind of remind me of Paula Abdul sometimes


I'm better looking!

Top
#74573 - 01/13/11 02:27 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: TheWorldsGame]
AndyBarney Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 06/14/06
Posts: 1713
TheWorld'sGame

Interesting article!

However, I'm not seeing how this relates to the Legends philosophy which is a very positive and fair way of getting kids to try their hardest.

smile Andy

Top
#74576 - 01/13/11 02:55 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: TheWorldsGame]
AndyBarney Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 06/14/06
Posts: 1713
Quote:
AB: check out this article found in the Wall Street Journal from Saturday 1/8/2011. Tell us if this Chinese mother is teaching her kids to be brave and creative or if she is just downright abusive. What if instead of pushing music practice she was drilling them on deceptive dribbling and finishing moves?

"Can a regimen of no playdates, no TV, no computer games and hours of music practice create happy kids? And what happens when they fight back?"



TheWorld'sGame

Of all the comments on the thread this is the one I liked the most:

Quote:
Ms. Chua left more unsaid than said in her article; I assume her book covers the topics. I could also write a book on this topic, but I chose to write to the WSJ instead. Hopefully, they will publish my letter. I wish I had time and space to address each premise of her essay. I address two in my letter: her prejudice against drama and the lack of emphasis on creativity allowed in her method.

Grades: I agree that strong academics are important to success, but I disagree with the emphasis on grades over understanding the material presented. Children slip up for a variety of reasons illness, poor teaching resources, and actual disability. That doesn't mean that mastery of the material isn't possible, but it may be on a different time table than the grading time table. For example, I have one child with a disability that requires 2000-3000 repetitions of a word for him to have instant recall of that word and its meaning, and I have two other sons who need only 1-2 repetitions to learn the same word. All three have strong vocabularies, but my one son must work longer and harder for that particular skill, and it may take an entire school year for him to have new vocabulary ingrained in his head.

Choice is another factor missing from the Chinese method. These children are given no choice regarding the extracurricular activities they are involved in. Bruckner, Wagner and Beethoven would all be incredibly dull with only pianos and violins playing. When children have the opportunity to select an activity and own it, they tend to put more of themselves into it and require less proding to practice. My oldest son always wanted to dance and in 13 years of dance instruction, he has NEVER not wanted to go to a dance class unless he was ill or injured. He tried other things, but it became clear it was his passion when his baseball team won the championship. When he had to chose between baseball and dance because of time, he chose dance. He plans to continue to dance in college even though his chosen academic major is something else.

My youngest son chose piano and practices 90 minutes to 2 hours per day except lesson day. He probably will never play Carnegie Hall, but he has never said he wanted to be a concert pianist. He has played in our city-wide music festival, and he plays in jazz band and a piano ensemble, all of which he enjoys. He has also continued with competitive swimming and select soccer. He finished in the regional finals in swimming and has traveled to England with soccer. All good things.

My middle son plays basketball, but mostly he has worked on developing strong social networks and leadership skills. It has given him opportunities nationally including the military's student-to-student program. He decided to try debate this year for the first time. He is going to the Stanford tournament and has made our state tournament.

Choice. They all chose well. I wonder what Ms. Chua's children would have chosen for themselves.

I am not overly strict or lienient. I am able to reason with my children, so that they can make wise choices and excellent goals for themselves. For the most part, they make good decisions, and I have yet to be disappointed with their goal-setting. They do a much better job, and are much tougher on themselves than I could ever be.



Top
#74579 - 01/13/11 08:37 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: AndyBarney]
Kaka Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 02/21/07
Posts: 2316
That is good one. I missed that post in all the hubris. I am probably a more simple man. I try not to over think it. I only have my kids do sports so they don't get fat and lazy. I figure that is the best gift I can give them....to not be a lazy, fat slob when they are 18 and I turn them out into the world. So sometimes I make them do things they don't want to do. I do believe passion is the best motivator so sometimes you have to give a little bit.

Top
#74609 - 01/18/11 07:26 AM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: Kaka]
AndyBarney Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 06/14/06
Posts: 1713
Soccer and Life - Moment by Moment



Traditional coaches see soccer as tactics and players as pieces in a bigger game with the end result as the prize. Legends coaches are wonderful people who see your child and youth soccer in the moment, as a vital step in a much more important game, with character for life as the positive consequence. When teaching your child we feel it is important to ignore basic human concerns, e.g. winning, in favor of the divine, e.g. giving. Ordinary people rebuke those who search for divine truth in life. This could be because they lack appreciation for the path to true happiness and fulfillment. Much as the life of the lottery winner is usually destroyed by the temptations that come with the unearned and undeserved windfall, the potential of your child will be curtailed by an outcome based tactical approach to any of life's pursuits including soccer practice and game play. Inflexible tactical perspectives, designed purely to win the game, can only rob your child of the creative self-determination that grows from brave and adventurous trial and error. Teamwork is vitally important in life. However, it mustn’t come at the cost of your child’s individual development. Too often individual development is sacrificed when the focus is on the outcome, (winning), instead of the process, (brave, creative leadership development).



Even children who focus on the process are initially able to just barely raise their heads and look out on reality. They see some things and miss others because they have to deal with their own challenges. Because the process is more than enough to deal with, they rise and fall at varying times but eventually break through to a higher understanding.



If you focus on the outcome, your child, while straining to win, will lose sight of the process and fail to maximize his/her potential. He/she will gradually discover that they are unable to rise much further. Such children end up uninitiated and less talented. They lack the basis of ability that is only gained from a process focus. Consequently they will struggle to achieve a fulfilled reality. Because their childhood experience is outcome based, where they go after is then dependent on the opinions and needs of others, rather than their own truths and passions. If your child learns how to welcome the process of mastering one true and difficult thing, he/she will also learn the ability to pursue and conquer other more difficult opportunities, where even more can be achieved. He/she will have experienced the most, so will have the platform and capacity for greater vision.



If your child is judged by outcomes, with the fear, guilt, shame and blame outcome based teaching espouses, he/she will have seen and absorbed the least of what truly determines success (i.e. doing your best). Coaches who focus only on outcomes tend to be the frauds and tyrants. Good parents will avoid such coaches at all costs.



If your child is taught by effective process, (The Legends way), through the amazing sport of soccer, he/she will be capable of surmounting and succeeding at a wide variety of meaningful and fulfilling human challenges during his/her lifetime. When your child learns to focus on effective process he/she will see the most and always apply the memory of enjoyable process based learning to the present moment. Depending on how much your child has conquered the process of brave, creative soccer leadership, he/she will be able transfer this pioneering sporting character into unique responsive ways to influence the family, philosophy, politics, medicine, business, the arts etc. The legacy for society can only be positive and enduring. Legends soccer is the most enjoyable way for your child to learn tremendous expertise and skill while building incredible character. As a consequence he/she can only develop tremendous depth of character while also enjoying the spirit of fun. This makes soccer coached the Legends way a very difficult, but welcome and gratifying, learning environment.



“Service which is rendered without joy helps neither the servant nor the served. But all other pleasures and possessions pale into nothingness before service which is rendered in a spirit of joy.”
Mohandas Gandhi



Ordinary people may rebuke your child for taking the risks necessary to become a brave, creative leader, for they are unaware that the process based student is a lover of wisdom. By embracing the Legends methods your child will become a “go-getter” with a brave, creative, leader character. He/she will ultimately possess the desire to give, to do the right things and will ultimately become a talented servant leader. This is the best sort of leader!



“A great man is different from an eminent one in that he is ready to be the servant of the society.”
B.R. Ambedkar

Top
#74612 - 01/18/11 10:42 AM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: AndyBarney]
AndyBarney Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 06/14/06
Posts: 1713
Creative Repetition Develops
Skill And Character

In Matthew Syed’s excellent book “Bounce” he tells the following story:

“In 1984 Desmond Douglas, the greatest ever UK table tennis player was tested for reaction time. His reactions were slower than the entire English squad including the team manager. At the time Douglas was universally considered to have the fastest reactions in world table tennis. His style was based on standing with his stomach a couple of inches from the edge of the table, allowing the ball to ricochet from his paddle using lightning reflexes that astounded audiences around the world. He was so sharp that even the leading Chinese players, who had a reputation for extreme speed, were forced to retreat when they came up against him. But here was a scientist telling us that he had the most sluggish reactions in the whole England team, including the team manager.

It turns out that Douglas had perhaps the most unusual grounding of any international table-tennis player of the last half century. The table tennis tables he learned on were housed in the tiniest of classrooms. There was so little space behind the tables that, “we had to stand right up against the edge of the tables to play, with our backs almost touching the blackboard. Spin and strategy hardly came into it; the only thing that mattered was speed.”

Douglas did not spend a few weeks or months honing his skills in that classroom, but the first five years of his development. “He spent all his time in that classroom practicing his skills and playing matches. I have never seen anyone with such dedication.”

In essence Douglas, a man without great reactions, spent more hours than any other player in the history of the sport encoding the characteristics of a highly specific type of table tennis. He was able to perceive where the ball was going before his opponents even hit it. That is how a man with sluggish reactions became the fastest player on the planet.”

There are great similarities between the Legends coaching approach and the way that Desmond Douglas learned to play table tennis. The backgrounds of Michael Jordan and Magic Johnson in basketball, and Wayne Gretsky in hockey, are also characterized by unique pressures on time, space and skill. This is a background commonality shared by all of the world’s really great soccer players i.e. Pele, Cruyff, Maradona, Zidane, Ronaldo, Ronaldinho, Christiano Ronaldo.

Over two decades of study and experimentation the Legends program has developed a curriculum that teaches your child intricate and complicated foot skills, dribbling moves and accurate, powerful shooting ability. It then puts your child in very tight spaces under pressure so that these skills become intuitive and effective at great speed.

The founding club’s Kansas City indoor practice facilities contain two 72’ x 36’ foot fields and one 44’ x 24’ field with 8’ foot high side walls that provide 18 player roster teams with nine separate eight foot wide goals so that each player can play simultaneous 1 v 1 rebound shooting games against a team mate. In this game of “Wall Ball” players rotate every few minutes so that everyone plays each other during practice.

The newest Legends facility also has nine 12’ x 20’ BoxSoccer Courts for first time finishing practice. In an hour of “BoxSoccer” players take between 800-1000 shots. This escalates the unique Legends “Wall Ball” shooting training to the highest yet known level of shooting repetition. 800-1000 shots in an hour eclipses any shooting repetition factor yet known to man. In “Box Soccer” practices your child will have tremendous fun striking hundreds of first time shots. This environment will develop your child’s first time shooting to a previously unimagined degree of proficiency. This process will benefit Legends trained players in the same way that Desmond Douglas developed his world class table-tennis style, speed and tactical understanding. The beauty about the way in which the Legends club has structured both the curriculum and the environment is that no other club, (unless they are prepared to invest the funds and copy the Legends curriculum/environment), will be able to develop either such incredible shooting skill or speed of tactical recognition. Everything else being equal, the unique Legends combination of environment and curriculum will explode your child’s ability to shoot and score under immense pressure. This opportunity will eclipse any other known method of developing great finishers.

It’s a big, hairy, audacious claim to make but a lifetime of research has led me to understand that there is no other curriculum and/or environment as unique and beneficial to your child as the Legends one. Decades of research has failed to discover any youth soccer program, (professional or otherwise), around the world that has either a published curriculum or structured environment that focuses on, and optimizes, extreme deceptive dribbling and shooting. What is perhaps more surprising is that this omission exists despite all the evidence that the world’s greatest players in soccer, basketball & ice hockey developed deceptive dribbling and shooting skills early in their sports career. They then refined those skills in situations and environments that compressed space and escalated pressure on deceptive dribbling and shooting.

The most important aspect of developing phenomenal “Big Play Skills” is what happens to your child’s character. While your child’s skill is blossoming so are his/her self-concept, peer respect, bravery, creativity and leadership. It is in these deep character benefits that your child gains the greatest value and benefit for life. In the Legends program your child is guaranteed to become an excellent soccer player but more importantly he/she will develop incredible depth of brave, creative, leadership character for life!

Top
#74659 - 01/22/11 08:27 AM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: AndyBarney]
AndyBarney Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 06/14/06
Posts: 1713
Our Wonderful Coaches

Soccer can provide the opportunity for optimum spiritual and personal growth. If it doesn’t then our children are wasting far too much of their lives on it. As pick up games disappear, soccer clubs are becoming a vitally important developmental neighborhood for our kids. Legends for Life coaches are making it a neighborhood of brave, creative, leadership character development through the medium of competitive play. Good coaching is largely a matter of love. Or if you are uncomfortable with using “love” as the core defining component, “caring and respect” will do. Purposeful coaching is based upon caring deeply for each child. Only when our children know how much we love and care for them will they fully accept our teaching philosophies. Challenging our children to optimize their potential, instead of manipulating them for a statistical win and ego boost, is the essential shift in viewpoint.

Those who have read this far and think what I’ve said too crazy for coaching, should stop reading now. However, if you are a parent who wants your child to optimize his/her potential, Legends coaches and the “Legends for Life” method offers you a very personal perspective on coaching that will define your child’s character and potential. Our caring coaches create an incredible tolerance for risks, mistakes and comebacks. This “no fear” approach guarantees that your child will build brave, creative leadership character. Our dedicated and enthusiastic teachers create a democracy of talented soccer adventurers that, over time, transforms children into servant leaders for life. From day one Legends coaches challenge the assumption that the objective of each game is to win and that taking risks and making mistakes are to be avoided. Instead we believe that it is only when taking outrageous risks; those that often result in team losses, will your child ever conquer his/her greatest fears and go beyond “normal” to “extraordinary”.

As our Legends coaching team has grown in experience we have expanded our vision and impact beyond soccer to optimize potential for success and fulfillment in life. Legends coaches have a purist long-term plan for your child. We know what to focus on now to most benefit your child in the future. We have a great long-term vision for your child. Because our coaches clearly see the good and motivated person we expect your child to become, the temptation to take a short cut to win is easily resisted. We compare short-term gratification to long-term gain. We ask, if it’s right? Will it build character?” If not it’s rejected.

There are two broad categories of coaches:

1) Those who approach soccer as a trainable skill with all sorts of engineered, robotic responses that, when reproduced properly, serve to produce the greatest number of wins in the shortest possible time.

2) Those who approach coaching and teaching as a calling, a lifelong mission that combines engineering with dreaming, discipline with vision, perseverance with creativity, competition with compassion, goal setting with honesty, adversity with trust, to create an environment in which children can grow optimally and feel fulfilled. One in which your child learns to contribute earlier to a common good and lead others in positive ways.

The thoughts expressed here concern the growing need for more coaches with the second approach.

We’re in the midst of a turning point in the history. Our children no longer have to worry where their next meal will come from. Because this is so parents and teachers can now focus totally on fulfillment of potential instead of survival. Society has changed but coaching methods have failed to keep pace. As optimizing potential, instead of earning the most money, becomes more important, sports will serve children best by focusing away from winning to a concentration on building character and meaning for life. It is to be hoped that the last chapter on coaching to win by fear and rote learning has been written. It’s time to accept what’s happening in society; in our schools and workplaces. It’s time to reexamine outdated notions about power and coaching.

In traditional team soccer individual creative freedom is a myth. Although individual freedom occupies a central role in society, its value in team sports has been crushed at the altar of the statistical win. This country was founded on individual rights, freedom of choice and optimizing potential. However, our institutions rarely practice the pluralism they preach. Unfortunately for children team sports have been centered in winning not individual creative freedom. As a consequence of the perceived “need to win” risks that are vital to growth and individual development are often discouraged by coaches.

A paradox of coaching is that too many coaches take themselves and their public image too seriously, while too few take their responsibility to develop brave, creative leadership character seriously enough.

Coaching is not simply a skill, a technique, or a profession. Coaching is not something you do as a part of your climb up the career ladder. Purist coaching demands excellence in making the most of every child, regardless of genetic potential. As such, coaching is not a profession, it is a calling!

Coaching is a sacred trust in which the well being and potential of children is put in your care. It is a trust placed upon you, first by parents who gave you the job of optimizing their child’s ability, but more importantly it is a trust vested in you by a child who is relying on you to shape and mold their character for life.

Remember this, becoming a coach gives you authority but not power. It is the players you coach and their parents who will give you power. By their actions and responses they will bestow power upon you, but only if they trust you to use it well. Coaching is a matter of being in a trusting relationship. There is no separation of the spirit and the intellect. Where did we get the idea that love, caring, creativity and individual fulfillment should be suppressed in sports? Why is it that so many of our sporting metaphors are militaristic and our rhetoric is so much about masculinity and ego? Where did our sporting ethos come from? Why do we hide positive emotion, suppress the creative spirit and repress our passion for individualism in favor of conformity and the pursuit of short-term statistical wins? Is it that team sports are considered too important to be diluted by those feelings, or that sports aren’t important enough to deserve them?

These traditional paradigms are horribly wrong!

Most coaches choose to stand back and detach themselves from the caring, loving, human aspect of the job. They stay somewhat abstract and aloof, rather than fully participating in the lives of their players. As coaches we have a choice. We can be traditional, old time, coaches who provide convenient quick “winning” fixes to hide behind. Or we can really love and care about the long-term character of the kids we work with. Legends coaches, like great parents, choose to love and care.

Top
#74792 - 02/01/11 10:32 AM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: AndyBarney]
AndyBarney Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 06/14/06
Posts: 1713
Vikings vs Tradition vs Legends



In Life at the Edge of Chaos by Mark Youngblood he uses the metaphor of a Viking ship on a great voyage as a model for community and environment as follows:



“The Viking’s purpose was adventure (discovering, conquering, looting, pillaging, and so on), that is, the journey itself. Principles were the beliefs and values that guided the Viking’s decisions and behavior. Some of these would have included domination, ferocity, risk-taking, courage, teamwork and other such beliefs. Their strategy was the unique way in which they intended to fulfill their purpose. They chose a destination: the new world; a particular type of vehicle to get them there: a boat; and a particular approach: violent conquest.



The crew had a distinct culture-the way of sailors, their language, tribes, castes and social norms.”



This is strikingly similar in unhealthy ways to the traditional soccer model:



“The Viking’s purpose was adventure, (discovering, conquering, looting, pillaging, and so on), that is, the journey itself.”



The traditional soccer team’s purpose is similar: i.e. winning which encompasses discovering, conquering, dispossessing, rampaging, and so on. To most soccer teams that is “the journey itself”.



“Principles were the beliefs and values that guided the Viking’s decisions and behavior. Some of these would have included domination, ferocity, risk-taking, courage, teamwork and other such beliefs.”



Principles in all teams encompass most of the above. However, in the choice of strategy the Viking or traditional coaching approach, and the Legends approach, are poles apart.



The Vikings “chose:



A) A destination: the new world;



B) A particular type of vehicle to get them there: a boat;



C) A particular approach: violent conquest.”





By comparison traditional coaches choose:



A) Winning as the “destination”.



B) Team soccer (passing) as the “vehicle”



C) Tactics as the “particular approach”.





By contrast the Legends program advocates:



A) Brave, creative leadership for life as the “destination”.



B) Creative individual and team brilliance as the “vehicle”



C) Soccer at the edge of chaos as the “particular approach”.





The Viking and traditional soccer culture are also poles apart from the Legends approach.



In Viking culture the crew had:



A) The way of sailors.



B) Their own language (Scandinavian).



C) Tribes



D) Castes



E) Social norms.





Traditional teams have:



A) Role players.



B) Their own language (Passing).



C) Tribes or sub units i.e. defense, midfield, forwards.



D) Castes or positions i.e. strikers/goal scorers, midfield suppliers, defensive ball winners.



E) Social norms e.g. play it simple and safe, or two touch passing.





Legends teams have:



A) Courageous and creative democratic leaders.



B) Their own primary language (Elite deceptive dribbling and ball striking which are refined to a high degree before players enter the “team phase”).



C) No tribes because everyone is rotated through all positions.



D) No castes because Legends players are expected to play like a deceptive dribbling and goal scoring forwards when on the ball, without concern for where they are on the field or giving up a goal.



E) A unique social norm. In games and practices Legends players are challenged to take the greatest risks without regard for statistical outcomes. Only the bravest coaches can coach this method, and only the gutsiest kids have the confidence to attempt the scariest moves on the way to beating players and scoring great goals. In the Legends club high risk plays are the “social norm”. Players aren’t just “allowed” to take opponents on in dangerous areas of the field, they are expected to! The social norm is to “Go for it” regardless of consequences. Legends players are taught to ignore the possibility of losing the ball or giving up a goal when younger, in order to acquire the ability to beat opponents at will and score great goals, when older. As a consequence of taking greater risks when younger Legends trained players are certain to be better at keeping the ball and dictating the play when they are in their mid to late teens. This is the guaranteed, inevitable positive legacy of being taught and encouraged to take great risks when younger. More importantly, Legends players learn the essential life lesson that you can only optimize your life potential if you take intelligent risks.



This approach is what made the world’s most famous players great! After decades of research into the background of the greatest players in every democratic team sport, (e.g. soccer, basketball or hockey), we have gathered conclusive proof that all were deceptive dribbling and goal scorer and risk takers when younger! Accused when younger of being “Ball Hogs” or “Hot Dogs”, these great players later became the most important and effective team players of all.



The other major difference between Viking/Traditional soccer and the Legends is in “Structure”.



The Viking long ship operated with the following structure: “a hierarchical command-and-control management style, clear authority levels, separate roles and responsibilities, performance feedback (the lash…hmmm there’s an idea!), training systems (“Here’s an oar, now stroke!”), and compensation (all the “booty” you can carry).”



The structure of the traditional youth soccer coaching environment has many unfortunate similarities. Most coaches use a “command-and-control management style”. They hold tight to the reins of “clear authority”, instead of gradually teaching their players how to take control and self-determine. Traditional coaches mistakenly separate roles and responsibilities, (e.g. forwards, defenders, midfield), negative performance feedback is often delivered in the form of losing, blame and punishment, (e.g. bench sitting). Training systems are too tactical and restrictive. So they fail to optimize individual potential. In traditional teams the compensation and the justification for using negative coaching methods comes from winning games.



The structure of the Legends team is completely different! Our phenomenal coaches use a, “do your best”, brave, creative process focused method to encourage children to move beyond their comfort zones. Our coaches don’t manage! They teach and encourage courageous exploration with tremendous enthusiasm and praise for great effort. At every opportunity Legends coaches pass the responsibility and the reins to their players so that they can learn to be self-starters and develop the self-belief needed to lead. The Legends coach combines crucial responsibilities by rotating players through all positions and enthuses when forwards tackle back, defenders get forward and midfielders play both ways. This teaches every player to be a talented and confident “multi-tasker”. Furthermore, the Legends coach expects every player to dribble deceptively and make creative passing plays everywhere on the field, not just in the attacking third. This teaches children how to dominate the soccer ball and lead. It ingrains the essential confidence under pressure to operate at the highest levels in soccer and in life. Legends players play without fear of losing the ball because in the Legends club mistakes are welcomed as badges of honor and growth, not criticized as stupid errors that cause losses. Legends coaches avoid guilt, shame or blame because such commonly used negative feedback undermines self-concept and creates an environment of fear. Fear discourages the creativity and experimentation that is absolutely vital to personal growth! The Legends system is fluid and intuitive. Instead of being expected to follow orders like a robot Legends players are encouraged to make up their own solutions to the problems and challenges they encounter. Legends players are encouraged to think quickly and critically about situations, options and innovative solutions before choosing a path of ever greater complexity, difficulty and adventure. Legends coaches teach children to embrace the complex journey of optimal personal growth and 100% effort as the only compensation they should ever need. Legends coaches are focused on long-term learning as opposed to the short-term win prized by coaches who need satisfy their own ego by winning.



Interestingly, doing one’s best and maximizing personal potential always leads to optimum long-term positive outcomes.

smile Andy

Top
#74793 - 02/01/11 05:13 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: AndyBarney]
Duane Pipe Offline
journeyman

Registered: 01/24/06
Posts: 73
Loc: Lone Jack, Mo

Top
Page 273 of 298 < 1 2 ... 271 272 273 274 275 ... 297 298 >


Moderator:  Mike Saif, Tom Mura