Posts tagged ‘Indoor’

Preparing for Super F National Finals

The purpose of the winter Futsal league is mostly to keep the player’s foot on the ball during the cold midwest winter. But each year the teams in our club participate in the Super F National Finals. The tournament brings together teams from around the United States in age groups from U8 through Men’s Open. The tournament is great way to end the Futsal season and bring together all of the technical and tactical work we’ve done throughout the winter.

Being able to hold the ball under pressure is Continue reading ‘Preparing for Super F National Finals’ »

Training 2 v 1 Situations

Playing indoor soccer or Futsal during the winter provides a great opportunity to focus on teaching players how to break down defenses in 2 v 1 situations. This is an important tactical situation for players to understand and be familiar with because so much of the game can be broken down to 1 v 1 and 2 v 1 situations.

A book by David Goldstein, 2 v 1 Attacking Drills and Exercises , provides a tremendous amount of insight into the technical and tactical elements of combination play against one defender. It is very comprehensive; starting with basic principles and patterns before moving on to exercises and small-sided games. Here’s a short excerpt as an example.

2v1_Attacking_Drills-cover-500

False Double Pass Dribbling Option from Diagonal Pass

What is illustrated is a possible solution for an attacker when the defender, labeled C, makes a recovery run by tracking attacker B which in turn blocks the passing lane. The attacker B receives the ball in Square A from attacker A. The pass is numbered 1. In Square A1 attacker B passes off the ball diagonally, numbered 1and attacker A steps forward to receive the pass with a run numbered 1.

In Square A2 attacker B spins around the defender C in an attempt to get the ball back behind the defense. This run is numbered with a 1. Defender C however, starts making an effective recovery run which disrupts the ability of attacker A to return the pass to attacker B. In Square A3 where the pass should be sent forward defender C’s good recovery run and closing of the passing lane prevents the pass from occurring. The attacker A, now in possession of the ball, does not have a workable Double Pass Pattern anymore.

One of the best options for the attacker with the ball is to dribble into and across the area where attacker B’s run pulled defender C out of the space with the run. This solution is shown in Square A3 and attacker A’s dribble is numbered 1. There are a myriad of possible solutions but this is an effective one because it exploits the space that the defender had to surrender to achieve the blocking of the passing lane.

Diagonal Wall Passing

This use of wall passing is not often pointed out, taught or practiced with players. The left half of the above soccer field is Diagram 14 A and the right half is Diagram 14 B.  I hope that I made this clear enough that if you just walk through it slowly all the lines should come clear.

The reader can see in Diagram 14 A, page 54, the attacker, labeled A, use attackers B and C to create wall passes diagonally across the field. Attacker A uses a Low Wall Pass Pattern with attacker B and a Curved Run with attacker C to get into a scoring position behind the defense.

Attacker A sends a pass numbered 1 to attacker B. Attacker A then makes a run past the defender.  The run is numbered with a 2 which allows the pass back from attacker B. The return pass is also numbered 2 because the pass and the run are essentially simultaneous. Attacker A then passes the ball to attacker C with a pass numbered 3. While attacker C holds the ball in a shielded position attacker A makes a Curved Run around attacker C. The run by attacker A is numbered with a 4. Attacker C then plays off the ball with a pass numbered 5 for attacker A to shoot at goal which is numbered 6. This attack is done across the field in an East to West motion and not in the more traditional North to South manner of penetrating a defense and attacking the goal.

In the right half of field the reader can see Diagram 14 B, page 54. Another East to West attack is demonstrated using 2 versus 1patterns to penetrate the defense. Attacker A uses attackers B and C to cut diagonally across the field. The first pattern that A and B use is a High Wall Pass followed by a more traditional Wall Pass that combines attacker A and C which leaves attacker A with the ball in a position to pass the ball behind the defense to attacker D who shoots the ball at goal.

Attacker A starts the sequence by dribbling at the first defender; the dribble is numbered with a 1, and then passes the ball to player B to combine for a High Wall Pass. The pass to attacker B is numbered with a 2. The return pass by attacker B is numbered 3 as is the run by attacker A past the defender. Attacker A then passes the ball to attacker C to start a wall pass. This pass is numbered with a 4 and the run by attacker A to get behind the next defender is also numbered with a 4. Attacker C sends a penetrating pass back to attacker A, who receives it behind the defense. This pass is numbered with a 5. The attacker A is now in a position to cross the ball to attacker D who is making a run towards attacker A in front of the goal mouth. Both the cross by attacker A and the run by attacker D are numbered 6. The shot on goal is numbered with a 7.

Three Grid Game: Set-Up

This shows the organization for the start of the Three Grid exercise. Each group has a goal keeper, two defenders in the grid next to their goal keeper, one midfielder in the middle grid and one attacker in the grid where they can score. The exercise requires four field players for each team and a goal keeper for each team. The black team defenders are lettered B and A. The black midfielder is lettered with a C. And the attacker for the black team is lettered with a D. The white defenders are lettered E and F. The midfielder for the white team is lettered with a G and the attacker for the white team is labeled H.  Goal Keepers are stationed on both ends.

Teaching players to recognize and deal effectively with 2 v 1 situations during the indoor season will transfer very easily to the outdoor game in the spring. If they can see the ‘pictures’ in a 5 v 5 game they can look for the same cues when the game is 11 v 11.

Have a great day,

Tom

Sole of the Foot Control

With the outdoor season coming to an end in the Midwest of the United States, I’m turning my attention Futsal training. For anyone not familiar with Futsal, it’s played with a ball that is one size smaller than the ball the players use outdoor (U9-U12 play with a size three ball while U13 and above play with a size four). The ball is also constructed to have a low bounce to help keep it on the floor. The game is played on the same surface as a basketball court so the ball moves very quickly. These characteristics mean that it is sometimes easier to control with the sole of the foot rather than the inside of the foot.

During the outdoor season I discourage players from using the sole of their foot to receive the ball because of the uneven surface and the bounce of the ball. So during the first couple of practices I spend a lot of the time working on receiving and dribbling the ball with the sole of the foot.


Dribbling a Futsal Ball

This is a simple exercises to get the players comfortable with the different ball. To begin with they dribble with both feet, then only with their favorite foot, then with their not-so-favorite foot. I do this instead of right foot and left foot so that the players always get to start with their stronger foot before trying with the weaker foot. I encourage them to use the inside, outside and sole of their foot.

Next I introduce three sole of the foot moves: pull back behind the leg, pull back and go (also called a ‘V’ by some) and finally a stop, hop a go. The last is basically a hesitation move where the player drags the ball back as if to stop but then keeps their foot on the ball and rolls it forward. To begin, the players use the space between the cones to practice the moves. Eventually, they use the cones as defenders.

As a progression you can have three or four players stand on the cones with one foot and try to tackle with the other. Once this is easy for the players you can remove the cones and add an active defender to pressure the players.

Passing in Pairs

This is also a simple exercise. The key is to teach the players how to properly receive the ball with the sole of their foot.

Coaching Points

  • Toe up, heel down
  • Roll the ball out of your feet to set up the pass

Stepping on the ball is often the best way to control it as moves quickly across the court but it is also important to keep the ball moving to protect it from pressuring defenders.

I finish the session with a long scrimmage to go over the different rules for Futsal such as kick-ins, goalie throws and substitution rules.

How do your sessions change when moving from outdoor to indoor?

Have a great day!

Tom

Maintaining Soccer Fitness Indoor

The indoor season provides a change of pace and focus that I think is good for player development but you don’t want to completely lose the base of fitness that was built during the outdoor season. The challenge is that you have a limited amount of space to work with when you’re training indoor. We use a school gym, and a small one at that. I look for exercises that mimic the movement patterns of the game while using space as economically as possible.

 

The warm-up below is from Dave Tenney and included in our Ultimate Soccer Conditioning Training Pack. It includes all of the movements that occur in a game and can be adjusted to focus on whatever area is important to the coach.

 

Movement Progression
Exercise #1
Setup – jog, shuffle, spring, jog

Coaching Points
Decelerate – slow, stop, prevent muscle pulls

Exercise #2
Setup – back peddle, sprint, turn inside sprint, stop, job

Coaching Point
At the highest level turning is the difference between making it and not
making it .

Exercise #3
Setup – shuffle, spring, turn sprint, stop, jog
Open gate

The series of runs can also be done with a ball to add a technical element. Another progression is to add passing and movement as shown below.

Exercise #4
Setup – pass, set, play target – back to beginning

Coaching Points
• Part of speed is getting a rhythm of passing
• Hard pass vs. lay off
• Be precise
• Long pass is with inside of the foot
• Soccer fitness is the ability to be fast, be fast often and the ability to
recover between moments when you were fast.

These and many more conditions sessions are included in the Ultimate Soccer Conditioning Training Pack.

Have a Great Day!

Tom

Maintaining Soccer Fitness Indoor

The indoor season provides a change of pace and focus that I think is good for player development but you don’t want to completely lose the base of fitness that was built during the outdoor season. The challenge is that you have a limited amount of space to work with when you’re training indoor. We use a school gym, and a small one at that. I look for exercises that mimic the movement patterns of the game while using space as economically as possible.

 

The warm-up below is from Dave Tenney Continue reading ‘Maintaining Soccer Fitness Indoor’ »

Sole of the Foot Control

With the outdoor season coming to an end in the Midwest of the United States, I’m turning my attention Futsal training. For anyone not familiar with Futsal, it’s played with a ball that is one size smaller than the ball the players use outdoor (U9-U12 play with a size three ball while U13 and above play with a size four). The ball is also constructed to have a low bounce to help keep it on the floor. The game is played on the same surface as a basketball court so the ball moves very quickly. These characteristics mean that it is sometimes easier to control with the sole of the foot rather than the inside of the foot.

During the outdoor season I discourage Continue reading ‘Sole of the Foot Control’ »

Options for Soccer in the Winter

The approach of winter in the midwest means that teams are making plans for what they will do once the colder weather arrives. Traditionally the options have been limited; teams played indoor (arena style) soccer and held their practices at the indoor facilities or in school gymnasiums.

In the last 5-10 years more options have become available. Now teams can play Futsal, Indoor Soccer, Small-Sided Touchline Soccer or continue to practice and play outdoor on artificial turf fields. There are positive and negative aspects to each option.

Futsal is the only form of indoor soccer that is recognized by FIFA. For those that are unfamiliar with it, the game is usually played on basketball sized court with goals that are the same dimensions as those used in team hanball (6 x 9). When the ball goes out of bounds, play is restarted with a kick-in from the side line or a goal throw by the goalkeeper (or corner kick) for balls that travel over the end line. Adults use a size four ball while younger players use a size three. The ball is also different from an outdoor ball in that it is designed to bounce less.

The game is known for quick passing and tight ball control so it’s a great tool for teaching technique. But it’s also an excellent format for coaching tactics because it is played with four field players and a goalkeeper. The 4v4 game is recognized as the best format for small-sided games because it provides all of the tactical elements of full sided game while providing the players with more touches and opportunities to make decisions.

The game of Indoor Soccer or Arena Soccer first appeared in the US in the in the late 70’s and combines aspects of soccer and hockey. The field is surrounded by boards up to eight feet high and the goals are set into the walls at each end of the field. The game is played with a regular soccer ball and includes five or six field players and a goalkeeper. Field sizes vary greatly and can be anywhere from 210×80 feet down to 155×60 feet. They generally use artificial turf for their playing surface.

This is a very fast form of soccer where the ball is almost always in play because of the high walls. Even when it leaves the field, it is quickly put back into play because there is usually a net that surrounds the area above the boards and extends to the ceiling. It is the speed of the game that most appeals to both the players and the spectators.

Small-Sided Touch Line Soccer combines aspects of Futsal and Arena Soccer. It’s played on a turf field that is usually smaller than an Arena field but uses lines rather than walls for the boundaries. The size of the teams varies generally it is played as five or six-a-side.

This is the indoor game that most resembles a mini version of the outdoor game and that is why it is the preference of many coaches and players.

Continuing to play outdoor throughout the winter is an option that is favored by more teams as they begin to play 11v11 because it allows them to continue their normal training routine.

Advocates of one style or another list the benefits of their choice while bemoaning the shortcomings of the others. Personally, I feel there is something to be gained from each of these games. In my opinion even older players benefit from playing a game other than the regular outdoor game for part of the year because it demands different things from them both technically and tactically. There is also something to be said for a change being as good as a rest.

This winter my teams will practice one week indoor on a Futsal court and outdoor on artificial turf the next week. We will play an eight games season of Futsal as well as an eight game season of Arena Soccer along with the occasional outdoor scrimmage with other teams from out club.

We will also take a couple of weeks off around the holidays to take a break from the game completely.

I feel that this will give us the best of all possible worlds.

As always, I’m interested in your opinion and what you will be doing with your teams this winter.