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#66497 - 03/01/10 11:16 AM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: Keep It Fun]
mude Offline
enthusiast

Registered: 10/29/09
Posts: 387
At least as difficult as any individual physical skill (shooting, dribbling, passing, etc.) is the decision about which to do and when they should be done.

Learning fast decision making and the importance of making surrounding players better under pressure is probably as a good a take-away for skills outside of the game as other part of soccer.

Preaching dribbling as the first, second and third options leads to well.......very good dribblers. Being a great leader is often highly related to making surrounding people stronger and better (rather than simply being good at a particular physical skill).

I am assuming your written words are largely meant to be flamboyant and attract attention for the purpose of marketing your club. I hope that is the case if people are entrusting their childen with you for training. But since it is not 100% clear, I figured it was worth mentioning.

Again, I think Andy has a bunch of ideas that really make sense if you can sift through the nonsense (not necessarily long term, but for a certain stage of development).

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#66501 - 03/01/10 04:04 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: mude]
Kyle Offline
member

Registered: 10/13/08
Posts: 116
As a kind of reverse follow up to the Zidane and Ronaldo posts. Below is soccernets scouting report of Landon Donovan. I've gotten the chance to watch Landon closely the last month or so and in my opinion there are two things that keep Landon from becoming a top 25 player in the world: his ability to beat defenders 1v1 and his finishing.

There were a handful of situations in the Man U game where Donovan was isolated with a defender 35 yards or less from the goal and honestly he seemed unconfident in his ability to attack. More times then not he played the ball backwards. Would Ronaldo, Kaka, Messi, or Rooney have trailed the ball?

Scouting thumbnail: Pacy, creative player who flourishes in space. Lacks the one-on-one moves to beat a defender consistently, but uses the ball intelligently and excels on the counter attack. Has improved his set-piece delivery.

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#66502 - 03/01/10 04:08 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: Kyle]
Benefit8 Offline
stranger

Registered: 03/07/07
Posts: 15
Did you see Landon’s open goal miss from 2 yards out!! OMG…shocking!

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#66503 - 03/01/10 04:22 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: Benefit8]
EFS Offline
member

Registered: 03/22/06
Posts: 174
Loc: Overland Park
Andy,

As a lower level premier/rec club which is open to all players, do you focus immediately on fun or is your club interested in being competitive?

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#66506 - 03/01/10 05:08 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: Kyle]
mude Offline
enthusiast

Registered: 10/29/09
Posts: 387
Originally Posted By: Kyle
As a kind of reverse follow up to the Zidane and Ronaldo posts. Below is soccernets scouting report of Landon Donovan. I've gotten the chance to watch Landon closely the last month or so and in my opinion there are two things that keep Landon from becoming a top 25 player in the world: his ability to beat defenders 1v1 and his finishing.

There were a handful of situations in the Man U game where Donovan was isolated with a defender 35 yards or less from the goal and honestly he seemed unconfident in his ability to attack. More times then not he played the ball backwards. Would Ronaldo, Kaka, Messi, or Rooney have trailed the ball?

Scouting thumbnail: Pacy, creative player who flourishes in space. Lacks the one-on-one moves to beat a defender consistently, but uses the ball intelligently and excels on the counter attack. Has improved his set-piece delivery.



Oh, I don't know......I suspect Mr. Donovan would fair pretty well playing in one of the lower division youth leagues around KC. I suspect we are all in agreement that if you want to be a top 25 player in the world, then you need world class footskills (and I suspect top speed, strength, game sense, durability, etc.), but most of the kids around here are not likely to reach that target no matter what training they receive.

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#66508 - 03/01/10 06:23 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: mude]
Greg7 Offline
journeyman

Registered: 03/30/06
Posts: 82
Loc: Lees summit
I wouldn't class the Legends club as a true rec club, they are making thier way back and still have one or two good teams who are in the top 5 in KC. Vermillion's u14B World Class 1 are a good team and the U15 G team are playing Divison II this Spring.

I can understand that Andy is doing everything he can to get this once good club back from being a divsion 3 or 4, it's not a rec club, that's a little ough on them!

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#66511 - 03/01/10 07:03 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: Greg7]
Keep It Fun Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 06/25/05
Posts: 2404
Loc: Kansas City, MO
Greg, you have to know EFS was just doing some ribbing. We all know they're not a rec club.

The U16G are a good team too.
They finished middle of the pack MRL 1st division with some good wins, and some tough losses. They lost a 4-3 heartbreaker to KCFC in last years state cup semi, and the year before almost won it just missing a breakaway chance in regulation but losing in extra time to KCFC in the final.
If they play MRL again this fall, with KC Metros and KCFC promoted to premier they have a shot at winning their division and getting promoted themselves.
They have also picked up at least one player from the now scattered Scream team which should make them stronger.

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#66512 - 03/01/10 07:31 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: mude]
AndyBarney Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 06/14/06
Posts: 1684
Mude

Quote:
Learning fast decision making and the importance of making surrounding players better under pressure is probably as a good a take-away for skills outside of the game as other part of soccer.

Preaching dribbling as the first, second and third options leads to well.......very good dribblers. Being a great leader is often highly related to making surrounding people stronger and better (rather than simply being good at a particular physical skill).


I couldn't agree with you more! Just as we have a tremendous philosophy for developing 1 v 1 skills we have an unbelieveably great way of developing team decision making ability and leadership under pressure.

That's one of the main reasons why we have such a tremendous track record.

2 v 2 Games Are Essential

The Legends club philosophy is unique in many positive ways. One of the unique attributes is 2 v 2 for all our players.
2 v 2’s are vital to the development of the highly skilled team leader because they provide the essential bridge between the creative individual dribbling and shooting development and the 11 v 11 game. Without 2 v 2 players have a much tougher time utilizing the Legends dribbling fakes and shooting skills in the big game situation. With intense 2 v 2 training the extremely difficult dribbling and shooting skills we emphasize so enthusiastically, transfer much more quickly and effectively into the real game situation.

The Legends approach to playing soccer builds on the theme that every player is the team’s quarterback when in possession of the ball. Early practices focus intensely upon developing the individual techniques and skills that a great “soccer quarterback” will need in the game situation. 1 v 1 and 2 v 2 provides the practical perspective that accelerates the understanding of how to apply those skills effectively in the game situation.

The Legends approach is to concentrate relentlessly on the most difficult and complicated skills in the most challenging and confusing area of the field. 2 v 2’s speed up the process of being able to make big plays using those skills under intense game pressure. Statistically the 2 v 2 situation gives the player 25% of ball possession during each game. When compared to the 3 v 3 situation, 2 v 2 enhances individual skill acquisition 50%. When compared to 4 v 4 the skill acquisition ratio of 2 v 2 is 100% better. Therefore, 2 v 2 provides each player at least half or double again the skill development when compared with the other close variations of the small-sided game. The unique “Training Soccer Legends” system guarantees that each player will play every minute of 2 v 2, thereby maximizing learning time by eliminating time lost because of substitutions and waiting one’s turn to play.

A further benefit of the 2 v 2 is that, as players mature, it provides the ideal environment to develop the wall pass, wall pass fake, overlap, overlap fake, double pass and takeover plays. These are the six most effective ways of combining with a teammate to penetrate an opponent’s defense.

A gigantic further benefit of the Legends 2 v 2’s is the close proximity of both goals. Playing with two goals spaced 20-25 yards apart so that players can play a realistic end-to-end transition game yet always have the opportunity to shoot, is a vital aspect of developing the self-belief necessary to become a goal scorer and team leader. When goals are positioned so that all players are constantly within shooting distance, all players will acquire the instinct to shoot quickly and consequently develop to their full goal scoring potential.

Any player who practices 2 v 2’s the Legend's way will be maximally prepared to make use of the Training Soccer Legends, “big play game winning super skills” under pressure, in the competitive cauldron, on match day. The reinforcement that accrues from being completely prepared and consequentially more successful in games, feeds into a positive motivational spiral that significantly accelerates skill acquisition and self-belief, plus the willingness to take responsibility and lead.

The benefits of 2 v 2’s are as follows:

• 2 v 2 accelerates the essential development of the skill and vision under pressure necessary to be a “soccer quarterback”.

• The 25% ball ratios provide a significant degree of guaranteed possession and far greater individual skill development than traditional small-sided games with higher numbers.

• 2 v 2 creates the ideal environment for learning to combine with teammates while also enjoying a high ratio of ball possession and developing great individualism.

• In 2 v 2 there are no substitutions so every moment is a learning opportunity and games are more fun.

• 2 v 2 provides maximal preparation for the 11 v 11 game. This leads to greater confidence and willingness to take creative and positive developmental risks under pressure. These are the building blocks of leadership.

smile Andy

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#66513 - 03/01/10 08:12 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: AndyBarney]
mude Offline
enthusiast

Registered: 10/29/09
Posts: 387
As I have said many times Andy, I think there is much good about your ideas(most borrowed of course which is not a bad thing at all). But, the idea of constant focus on the individual does not lead to the best leadership (or athletes for people unless then end up having dramatically better natural ability than the people they compete against - in which case, there are a lot of training technicques that would probably lead to success in that situation).

The best "leaders" I have seen in the high school age group (athletically or basic leadership on the field) have not played in your system beyond age 12. That could change when you get the best kids again, but we will see.

Again, I am impressed with the marketing and I think you have a lot of good ideas. The extreme barrage of only concentrating on the individual (mentally and physically) and belief that soccer is literally the best/only way to create leadership is insulting (certainly should be to the many potential leaders that don't possess much athletic ability).

I really do hope you make great leaders out of the kids because we could all use them going forward. Just know that your attitude has largely lost a person that was previously a supporter of your club and what I thought was your philosophy. Probably more my mistake than yours.

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#66515 - 03/01/10 10:06 PM Re: Soccer as a Vehicle for Learning Life Lessons [Re: mude]
Kyle Offline
member

Registered: 10/13/08
Posts: 116
Oh, I don't know......I suspect Mr. Donovan would fair pretty well playing in one of the lower division youth leagues around KC. I suspect we are all in agreement that if you want to be a top 25 player in the world, then you need world class footskills (and I suspect top speed, strength, game sense, durability, etc.), but most of the kids around here are not likely to reach that target no matter what training they receive. [/quote]

Well then should we forgo training footskills because its not likely that we're going to train a World Cup player? If a kid can make his highschool varsity because he has incredible ball control doesn't that make it worth it? We do have some lower level teams, but I guarantee we can get more out of those players then any other club and truly maximize their potential.

Also, there is no rule that says you have to have incredible athletic ability to develop leadership abilities through soccer. You don't have to be a college player to have developed a tremendous self concept and creative outside the box thinking through the game.

Food for thought: Don't you think Donovan wishes he had the footskills of a Ronaldo or Kaka?


Edited by Kyle (03/01/10 10:11 PM)

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